Unexpected Garden Trends We Can’t Get Enough Of

by Carson BuckMay 28, 2018

Unique Ways to Redevelop Your Landscaping

It’s said that by gardening, we cultivate our sense of place. The author Michael Pollan has even said that, “the garden suggests that there might be a place where we can meet nature halfway.”

Well, regardless of how you may personally feel about rolling up your sleeves and getting your green thumbs dirty, it can hardly be argued that getting outside and spending time in a well-designed, carefully put together outdoor space isn’t time well spent.

So, if you’re thinking about redesigning your garden this year, here are some of the best and most unexpected garden trends for spring of 2018. Maybe you can find inspiration in one of them and meet nature halfway in your own garden.

new garden trends

Xeriscaping

Water conservation is becoming more and more serious business in many parts of the United States. Xeriscaping involves planting trees, shrubs, and cover plants that do well in your area with only the natural rainfall that comes every year. It has been practiced as a gardening technique throughout the Southwest for many decades.

Xeriscaping is also a great way to have a beautiful looking garden, without the hefty water bill that usually goes along with it. Why not try xeriscaping some or all of your yard? It can be gorgeous if done well, and it’s usually easy to maintain and better for the planet.

The Mindfulness Garden

Another hot trend right now involves bringing mindfulness meditation outside and creating a space to practice in your garden. It doesn’t take much more than a comfortable bench or patch of grass and a quiet, peaceful setting to enjoy mindfulness outside.

You can go completely over the top and transform your entire yard into a zen rock garden in the traditional Japanese manner. Or you can keep it a bit more simple, and just create a space for meditation in nature somewhere in your garden.

new garden trends

Air Purification

Another unique and interesting gardening trend that’s taking off this year involves planting air detoxifying plants. We all learned in school that plants breathe in carbon dioxide and breathe out oxygen (so they combat global warming too!). But along with carbon dioxide, they also breathe in and store VOCs and other harmful substances.

And, while indoor air-purifying plants have gotten most of the attention so far, there are plenty of airborne toxins lurking in your garden that could use a bit of scrubbing out of the air. Plant some air-purifying plants in your garden and breath in the results.

Outdoor Living Spaces

Lastly, the concept of outdoor living spaces, or living rooms, is still hot. Most people don’t give the external areas of their home the same level of attention as they pay to the interior, but this is a huge missed opportunity.

Think about it: unless you’re living in the far north, you probably spend more time outside during the summer months than you do inside. So why not transform your yard, deck, or patio into a livable outdoor space?!
new garden trends

Finding New Ways to Enjoy Your Little Slice of the Great Outdoors

Chances are good that if you’re reading this article, you have a yard or patio that you’re wondering what to do with. Make this the year that you take one or all of these great, unexpected gardening trends and put them to use. With a little bit of effort, you can easily transform your available outdoor space into something you’ll use more, for entertaining, meditation, or just for breathing the clean air.

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About The Author
Carson Buck
Carson is a real estate agent based out of Phoenix, Arizona. Carson loves data and market research, and how readily available it is in today's world. He is passionate about interpreting these insights to help his clients find and buy their perfect home. Carson got into the real estate industry because he loves the feeling of handing over the keys to a new home to happy clients. In his free time, he works on his backyard bonsai garden and spends time with his wife, Julia.

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