With a rent to own property, do you have to put a down payment on that property? And is the property going to be in my name?

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(0) | asked by: Natalie G-Campbell | share | 24 months ago | Report
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answer by Johnny James   |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
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A formal downpayment or an amount credited to the down payment every month.
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17 months ago  |   Report   |   share
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answer by darnell boyd   |   answered questions: 2
Did not answer my question could not see the answer
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answer by darnell boyd   |   answered questions: 2
If you live in a rent house an there is a option to rent to own the home do the landlord need fix what is wrong with the house.as far as maintance like windows doors floors n plumbing.
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17 months ago  |   Report   |   share
answer by Dana Fassett   |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
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I agree with Vivianne when it comes to Rent-To-Own. But if you can find the right seller that is willing to finance, now is a great time to buy. If you aren't able to qualify right now, but may in a few years? You have options but your not going to get the terms the banks are offering, if the numbers make sense I say go for it. I bought my house seller finance and my name is listed in the public records as owner, I only will lose if I don't make my payments. Find a Reatlor that really understands the ins and outs of transactions like these.
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24 months ago  |   Report   |   share
answer by Vivianne Rutkowski   |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
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What made you attracted to Rent-To-Own? Is it the illusion of easy home ownership? Most rent-to-own are overpriced because Sellers do take the risk and want to be compensated for it. But YOU, the Renter also take a risk. Even if the Seller is current on the payments, he/she may stop being current the day after you sign your Rent-To-Own contract. Often the renter/buyer finds out many months later when the house is in foreclosure - it means you just lost your downpayment and perhaps a Home that you fell in love with to some unscrupulous Seller. Also, statistically speaking, most rent-to-own buyers purchase another home than the one they contracted. FHA loans require 3.5% down. Why not purchase the traditional way? As a bonus, you'll have a huge inventory of homes to choose from. Good Luck. Vivianne Rutkowski, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage
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24 months ago  |   Report   |   share
answer by Don Butcher   |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
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As a seller who has done that I must strongly agree with Dana on the "skin in the game' comment. As a young investor in a recovering market in the early 80's I tried both ways and if the buyer/tennant in the rent to own deal has little to lose, why not walk after getting behind on payments. I'm happy to help you with your specific question if you contact me. Thanks and good luck.
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24 months ago  |   Report   |   share
answer by Dana Fassett   |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
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Without deposit its not usually in the best interest of the sellers to allow first right of refusal with a regular deposit as you would see in renting. A seller (usually) to consider a lease purchase wants to see that you have "skin in the game". Be sure you know if the title/deed is clear before you do anything. If they are upside in their mortgage YOU WILL LOSE! I have seen this with renters who gave thousands only to have the sherriff knock on the door. Be sure to work this type of transaction with an attorney's office, real estate company, or title company if you are not sure of what youre doing.
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24 months ago  |   Report   |   share
answer by Becky McNeer   |   Contact Me
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Most sellers will require a downpayment. While you are renting, you should save towards a downpayment. You must qualify in order to purchase the home home. When you do close, your name will be recorded by your county as the homeowner.
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answer by Becky McNeer   |   Contact Me
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The downpayment will depend on the Seller. Most likely they will require a downpayment. While you rent, you should make sure you are also saving towards a downpayment. The Seller wants you to be qualified, you must be in order to purchase the home. The home won't be in your name until you purchase and everything is recorded at your county department.
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24 months ago  |   Report   |   share
answer by IreneStager.com   |   answered questions: 4
Yes, your downpayment is based on your loan, not being "rent to own" or straight out purchase. As far as the property being put in your name, the property will remain in the current owners name until you close and the transfer is recorded at the county.
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answer by Stuart Hubbard   |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
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I'm sure that the seller would like for you to put down a deposit for the purchase but it is not a requirement. As long as the seller and buyer(or tenant and landlord) agree to the terms, either way is fine. You will find that in most cases that the seller/landlord requires a securty deposit to protect them in the event that the purchase transaction does not go through. Stuart Hubbard Associate Broker RE/MAX Commonwealth
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answer by Steven Byrd   |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
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Ultimately it is up to the seller/landlord on any downpayment requirement. Typically a seller would require some form of deporit to be later applied towards purchase price. The property would not be in your name with a rent to own, not until you actually close on the sale of the property. Soemtimes the seller will offer to finance the property themselves (vs. obtaining financing from a bank/mortgage company) in this case the property would be transferred to your name and seller would hold deed of trust as collateral.
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24 months ago  |   Report   |   share
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