Kitchen Sink

[INFOGRAPHIC:] Real Estate Breakdown of The Top 5 High Income Markets in the U.S.

The U.S. Census Bureau recently released a report naming New York City suburb, the Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT metropolitan area, the area with the highest concentration of high income households in the U.S. The report, titled The Geographic Concentration of High-Income Households, defines high income as being in the top 5 percent of the national income distribution (an income of at least $191,469)… [read more]

Shares 0

The U.S. Census Bureau recently released a report naming New York City suburb, the Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT metropolitan area, the area with the highest concentration of high income households in the U.S. The report, titled The Geographic Concentration of High-Income Households, defines high income as being in the top 5 percent of the national income distribution (an income of at least $191,469).

David Johnson, the Census Bureau’s Chief of the Social, Economic, and Housing Statistics Division, states that “this report addresses one aspect of the growing interest in income distribution by examining the geographic spread of high-income households.” Homes.com examined the housing market in the top 5 areas to expand on this growing interest. What do these markets have in common?

Coastal areas, particularly the Northeast region and along the Bay area in California, dominate the list of the top largest concentrations of wealth in the country. Naturally, these areas also have higher real estate prices and home values. Are you interested in finding more commonalities? Check out our infographic below:

markets1
markets2
markets3
markets4
markets5

Shares 0

One Reply to [INFOGRAPHIC:] Real Estate Breakdown of The Top 5 High Income Markets in the U.S.

  1. Interesting information and graphics you have presented. I find it fascinating that in all five top markets, somewhere around a quarter of the homeowners of these high-value properties are under age 20. What are these young people doing that allows them to have such a high income that they can afford these properties? Alternately, is this a case of wealthy parents either purchasing high-end properties for their offspring, or sheltering the properties by putting them in the name of their children? What are your thoughts on these statistics from that point of view?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *