Repairs Every Homeowner Should Budget For

by Whitney Baum-BennettJanuary 23, 2018

In a perfect world, everything that we own and care about in our home would stay in perfect condition and never need to be repaired or replaced. Unfortunately, this just isn’t the case. Your home’s systems and appliances will experience normal wear and tear, especially when you’ve owned a home for several years.

Repairs and maintenance are an expected part of owning a home, and it is important to budget for such repairs, as costs can quickly add up. Financial experts warn homeowners that they should expect to pay about 1-4% of their home’s purchase price in home repairs each year. Whether you are a first-time homeowner or have purchased a few homes in your lifetime, here are some repairs every homeowner should budget for.

five home repairs to budget for

Leaky Faucets

You’ve most likely heard it before: the steady “drip, drip, drip” of a leaky faucet that seems to never end. Beyond being an annoyance, this can be a major source of water loss in your home. Considering how much the average homeowner is paying for water, a leaky faucet can lead to an unexpectedly high bill.

The good news is that a leaky faucet is usually caused by a worn-out metal washer in the sink that needs to be replaced. This is a simple fix you may be able to do yourself with supplies from your local hardware store. However, if the problem is more severe, this repair can cost a few hundred dollars. A leaky faucet can go unnoticed for a long time, so it is important to get it repaired as soon as possible before your bill increases any further!

Garbage Disposal Replacement

Often overlooked, the garbage disposal is a convenient tool for getting rid of those unwanted food scraps. With proper maintenance, a garbage disposal should last approximately 10 years. Eventually, the motor will burn out, and getting a replacement will be the best course of action. Newer garbage disposals cost approximately $400 dollars, excluding installation costs. You can save money by installing it yourself, but it may be best to call a contractor to do it for you.

HVAC Unit Maintenance

Your HVAC unit is likely the largest and most important system in your home. It keeps you cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Replacing one of these units can cost several thousand dollars, so it’s important to dedicate funds to regular maintenance and upkeep of your system. It is recommended that a homeowner schedules annual—if not biannual—checkups with an HVAC professional who will inspect your system and identify any potential issues.

The average lifetime of an HVAC system is 15-25 years. Even with regular maintenance, it’s more than likely that you’ll have to repair or replace it at some point while you own the home.

Window Replacement

Similar to an HVAC unit, windows can be used to efficiently cool your home. Like anything else in your home, windows age and wear down. Their seals may break and allow drafts or rain to come through, and you may be forced to replace them. Depending on the type of windows you have in your home, replacement costs can vary.

Roof Repairs

Just like every other part of your home, it is important to pay attention to your roof. It is susceptible to things such as leaks, tears, rotting, etc. Depending on the damage, costs for repair can range from a few hundred dollars for lost shingles to several thousand dollars to replace your roof, according to HomeAdvisor.com. Regular check-ups and maintenance are key in avoiding higher repair costs.

As you can see, maintenance is needed in several areas of your home. Prepare for these five repairs to keep costs at a minimum, but be aware that this is not an exhaustive list. As you start the home buying process, account for the various repairs you may need to make as a homeowner, and factor those in when determining what you can afford.

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About The Author
Whitney Baum-Bennett
Whitney Baum-Bennett is the Digital Content Marketing and SEO Manager at Landmark Home Warranty. She enjoys writing helpful content for home buyers, sellers, and owners and real estate agents. She creates content on everything from DIY décor to interactive buyer and seller closing checklists. When she’s not writing, you can find her exploring her home of Washington, D.C.

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