Moving

Tips for a Successful Move: Part 2

The first part of my blog series about moving collaboration covered the decision to move, stress-free moving tips, and how to pack up your entire home in 30 days (or less). The collaboration with Homes.com continues with the second phase of moving–the move itself!

You’ve made the arrangements, chosen your new home, packed up your current one, and now the moving truck is waiting for you. You’ll either watch movers load it for you OR you will pack that baby up yourself. Well, if you are like us, you have a lot of heavy lifting ahead of you.

For our move, we opted to save money and do it all on our own. If you’re reading this and plan to move yourself, good news: we made some mistakes, and now we can pass along our hard-earned wisdom!

GET THE RIGHT EQUIPMENT:

To make moving those heavier items a breeze, make sure that you have these items listed below:

  • FURNITURE / APPLIANCE DOLLY: Request one from the truck rental company to help move washers, dryers, refrigerators and large dressers more easily.
  • FURNITURE LIFTING STRAPS: These will be your best friends for lifting armoires, large dressers, or even sofas.
  • TIE DOWNS: There are metal anchors or wooden slats in the moving truck that you can attach these to, or tie rope around to secure your larger pieces of furniture.
  • FURNITURE BLANKETS: Learn from our mistake and use furniture blankets to protect your furniture. When we began unloading the truck, we found that some furniture pieces rubbed against each other and scratched through the drop cloths. We thought we could cut corners and save some money, but by doing so it ruined five pieces of furniture.

LOAD THE TRUCK THE RIGHT WAY:

We have done local moves by ourselves before, but this was our first long-distance move on our own. In the past, we loaded up the truck with whatever would fit, drop off the load and come back for another. With this cross-country move, we have to pack it all and pack it right the first time, utilizing every inch of space! Here are my top four tips:

  • HEAVY ITEMS FIRST: Most rental truck companies will tell you to pack in a “T” shape to save gas and maximize the space. This means to secure all your heavy and tall pieces of furniture in the front of the truck (against the cab). Once the front part of the truck is full and stacked to the ceiling, place other heavy items such as dressers, tables and sofas in the middle of the truck.
  • BOXES & RUGS: Place rugs at the front of the truck, especially if you have an “attic space.” If not, place all area rugs underneath dressers to save space. Sort boxes by weight and load the heaviest boxes first. Regardless of size, always place the heaviest ones on the bottom. Then load boxes by size and stack all like-size boxes on top of each other so weight is distributed evenly.
  • MISC. ITEMS: For all items that won’t fit into boxes, load them around and on top of your larger furniture and boxes.
  • BEDS: Load your mattress sets after the whole truck is packed because they’ll be the first thing you want to unload. Place them along the door of the truck to hold everything else in place, and help prevent too much shifting as you travel to your destination. When unloading, go slowly as there might be an avalanche awaiting just behind them. If you use our loading tips, only slight shifting should occur.

ON THE MOVE:

  • SAYING “GOODBYE”: The home you are leaving carries many memories, so say your goodbyes and thank your home. You might be thinking… “Did this crazy lady just tell me to thank my house?” Yes. Yes I did. And here’s why: this home, now empty, has been filled with life. It’s where you spent good days and bad. Maybe it was your first home, where you brought a baby home. Maybe it was your starter rental and you are finally setting out on homeownership. Whatever your situation, thank it for the memories and all the life lived there.
  • THE TRIP AHEAD: For us, this move was as far of a cross-country move as you could get, from one coast to another. Here are my tips for making a long-distance move less stressful:
    • Pack everything you need in clear plastic totes instead of suitcases. Have outfits sorted by day and night and only bring into the hotel what you need each night. Keep toys and activities easily accessible and always have a first aid kit on hand.
    • Set daily driving hours and desired destinations, with backups in case you don’t make it that far. Sometimes the kids have enough or you hit more traffic than expected. I never book hotels ahead of time for this reason.
    • Traveling setbacks are out of your control. Some days we drove only five hours a day, then 12 hours the next. It wasn’t worth it to have cranky kids every day so we alternated long days and short ones until we reached our new home.

RELAX, YOU’RE HOME:

You survived packing, loading and traveling! But, before you relax, you have a truck to unload and a house to move into.

We opted to move ourselves to save money, but were left totally exhausted.  My advice: if you’re moving and at your limit, ask for help. Our truck didn’t come with muscle men to unload it, and we knew once we arrived to our new home that we’d need help. We called local moving companies and discovered you can hire them to unload your truck for you. For a surprisingly low cost of $200, we sat back and watched two men do all of the lifting! It was well worth the money after all of the work we had done.

We’re now settled into our new home in San Diego, California. While it’s been a long journey to get here, I can say it is so worth it. We have even more moving tips and advice to share with you so follow along with all that is to come! Moving is one of life’s biggest stressors, but it doesn’t have to be if you take one step at a time, you will soon be “home” again. – Jennifer

 

 

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Jennifer Ciani is a mom of two, wife to a Marine Corps veteran and the content creator behind the blog, Simply Ciani, where she shares easy to follow DIY’s, home decor, lifestyle and everyday tips for making life simple and organized.

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