Pending buyers of my occupied home are asking to to see house again (3rd time) causing me to clean, then vacate. Realtor says it's normal. Is it?

A local, very successful realtor gave an offer on my home the second day it was on the market (in her husband's name). I accepted the offer based on my realtor's advice, although it was $10,000 below the asking price. Everything is finalized w the exception of the appraisal which is in a few days and I know there won't be a problem w that. Our closing date is less than three weeks away. However, the buyer has asked to come Inside the house again on 2 different occasions. She gives a 24 hour notice, but I am required to make the home "show ready" and vacate, just as I did when it was being shown. The house is pretty clean, but not picture perfect, as I am preparing to move. A few days ago, she was in the house for an hour and a half. My realtor seems in awe of her for some reason, and says this is a normal procedure. She is coming again tomorrow for the third time in two weeks. I feel inconvenienced, not only because I am having to leave, but because it requires a lot of work and preparation and causes me to rearrange my entire day. I have questioned my realtor about this, but she implies I am not being reasonable, minimizes my complaints and assures me it is a common occurrence. I am not sure if she is being overly accommodating to the buyer (she can't say enough god things about her) or if this really is just normal procedure that I should continue to go along with. Opinions? Thank you
(0) | asked by: Lori evert | share | 5 months ago | Report
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answer by Heidi Johnson    |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
Hello, Sorry you have to go through the inconvenience, but it states in the contract that you will make your home available for inspections during a specific time frame. Yes, I know it's a hassle, but it goes with the territory of selling a home. I personally have shown a home to clients over 3 times and they stayed a long time taking measurements, planning furniture placement etc. Chin up you are not alone.
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4 months ago  |   Report   |   share
answer by Bruce Williams    |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
I can't speak to Real Estate Procedures in Tennessee, however as a buyers' agent in Nevada 2 times before COE in an occupied home seems like a lot. After escrow is open I typically want the buyer to stay away from the home until they take possession. The bigger issue seems to be your relationship with your agent. If your going to have someone represent you then you need to have someone you can trust. It could simply be an issue of your agent telling you what you need to hear, instead of what you want to hear. Write down a couple of your most important questions ask them to your agent listen to the response and make your decision
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4 months ago  |   Report   |   share
answer by LINDA MICHETTI, CRS    |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
What does she want to come for? Just say that its not a convenient time. If she's closing in three weeks, she can wait.
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4 months ago  |   Report   |   share
answer by James Atkinson    |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
Selling a home is not the easiest experience to go through. Reasonable accommodation of your buyer is certainly expected but keep in mind you have a contract pending the appraisal. I would not be so concerned about a spotless house. Also, don't be intimidated about vacating the home when and where - At this point in the deal you have a little more control. Communication is key. Discuss your frustration with you realtor and but a limit on how many more times this will go on. Im sure the buyer, being a Realtor will understand.
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4 months ago  |   Report   |   share
answer by Gloria Page & Jeff Reed    |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
of course it's normal! You too may want to go see your next home more than once. You may need to measure for new carpet, hardwood floors, measure for furniture, etc.... Once you get home, you'll think of 1 more thing you missed. It's the biggest purchase you will ever make... so you may want to check it out a couple times.
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4 months ago  |   Report   |   share
answer by Mike Downey    |   Contact Me
Im going against the grain here and say going in 3 times is NOT common if none of those times were from doing appraisal,inspection or final walk thru. That buyer is under contract to purchase your home and if they were to walk from the deal because it wasn't "clean" when you let them in for the 2nd or third time, they would be in violation of the contract terms and would loose all earnest money and could be sued. Making that house show ready generally only applies to the first showing because if its occupied, of course the house will be a little dirty or in disarray because thats what happens when you move. A buyer usually will have a few "outs" or contingencies to the contract, things like financing falling through, inspection came back bad or appraisal came back short, not "house not being show ready" or they didnt let me in for the third time. My biggest concern would be the realtor. Sounds to me like the agent is more concerned about the buyers best interest as opposed to their fiduciary duty to their seller. This is why we have buyers agents, to look out for the BUYERS best interest, not the sellers. Obviously you dont want to loose the buyer but dont loose site of the fact that they are UNDER CONTRACT to buy that house. Think about it, why in world would they need to spend an hour and a half in the house and STILL need to come back? Sorry, but if i were your agent i would've told told them as nicely as possible that they had two different chances to do whatever they had to do. Or simply put, my sellers are out of town and cant accommodate lol. Now, if they didn't have ample opportunity to get inside for whatever reason, then yes you would be in violation of your contract, but thats not the case at all!. There really isn't a legitimate reason in my opinion, good luck and hopefully they wont continue to be a pain in the butt lol. Thx!
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4 months ago  |   Report   |   share
I don't think it is that unusual. This is a very important decision they have made. Is the buyer or spouse an engineer? That would explain it. I married one so nothing personal they just like more details than some people. I would not make the home perfect every time but presentable. They must understand you are also trying to move.
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4 months ago  |   Report   |   share
It is not that unusual. I wouldn't have ask you to make it show ready but maybe they are very picky buyers. Is husband an engineer? That would explain it. Nothing against engineers I am married to one they just need lots of details.
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4 months ago  |   Report   |   share
Yes it is. They may be measuring for their furniture, getting ideas of what will go where, what they may need etc. No worries! Good luck on your closing. :)
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5 months ago  |   Report   |   share
answer by Tom Allen    |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
While this is unusual to say the least, I recommend you play along with it. It is annoying, and most buyers do not make such requests. You can always limit the visit to 10-15 minutes and schedule it at a time that's convenient for YOU. I'm concerned that your own Realtor is minimizing your feelings about this. Your Realtor should be in your corner on almost anything, including this. He/She should push back on the buyer if that is your wish.
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5 months ago  |   Report   |   share
answer by Carol Anne Teague    |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
If you were my Seller, I would counsel you to be patient and let them in as often as they need - they're "marrying" your house, and that's what we want. To refuse might cause them to feel that you're hostile, which is what we don't want. That said, the next time you get a request tell your Realtor® that they need to get all of their questions answered and pictures taken, because you need to be concentrating on moving. Since you're moving the house does not need to be immaculate, but please leave. Sellers sometimes unwittingly say things that turn buyers off and blow deals.
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answer by Teresa Bishop    |   Contact Me
I agree with Jeff & Ed, it's not common but it does happen from time to time that a buyer is so excited and makes requests to either show it to someone or take measurements of an area or even get a quote for flooring. I encourage my buyers to do all these things during the home inspection because the seller will be busy trying to find a place to move and with the moving process. If it's my listing, then of course I ask my client as requested but I don't feel that they need to have it 'show' ready because they are in the process of moving and the buyer should understand that. Either the listing agent or the buyer's agent should be present if you're not going to be home. I see no reason why you can't be home. I like it when buyers are emotionally attached, which this sounds like yours may be!
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answer by Ed McKeown    |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
I agree with Jeff. There is no real reason for a third. If they came for inspections that is another you are counting. They may be just very excited young buyers and want to show a parent that has not seen it yet. Think about them and their excitement. Do not leave, stay and talk to them. They are probably as excited as you once were. Don't be afraid they may really want you there.
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5 months ago  |   Report   |   share
answer by Jeff Bonte    |   Visit My Website   |   Contact Me
Three times seems excessive to me. I would not say it was common for a 3rd visit, until the walk-through on the day before/day of closing.
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5 months ago  |   Report   |   share
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