The crown jewel of New England, Maine offers 3,478 miles of tidal shoreline with an assortment of rental homes, from one- to three-bedroom lakefront cottages, to four-bedroom townhouses in Portland. Here, one can live in a contemporary cabin in the forest, or settle in a beachfront bungalow outside Kennebunk. With homes ranging between 750 to over 3000 square feet, there's something for everyone.

With one of the largest coastlines in the United States, and nearly 83 percent of the state covered by forest, Maine's regions are defined more by natural geography than demographics. To the southeast, you have the Maine Beaches, which has 30 miles of beautiful, sandy coastline. Just north is the greater Portland area, the largest metropolitan region and cultural hub in Maine. Continuing up the coast, in the northeast corner, bordering Canada, is Akroostook. To the west is the Maine Highlands, a natural wonder of mountains, lakes and forest. Here, tourists and locals alike enjoy Maine's greatest allure: nature. Next, running the length of central Maine is the historic Kennebec Valley, which is home to the state capital, Augusta. Finally, Maine's Mid-Coast region has the quintessential "New England look." With over 1,500 miles of coastline, the Mid-Coast has a rich maritime history.

From kayaking and hiking in Kennebec Valley, to skiing and trailblazing in the western Lake and Mountains Region, Maine is an outdoor enthusiast's paradise. For instance, people can bike, hike and explore the 47,000 acres that make up Acadia National Park. Along the coast, Maine's largest city, Portland, offers locals unique cultural and artistic experiences; here, one will find art galleries and cafes on the same block as an active shipping port. Finally, in Bangor, located in central Maine, one can attend the Bangor State Fair, which is one of the oldest state fairs in the country. The state is also host to over two dozen colleges and universities, including Bates, Colby and the University of Maine.

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