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A foreclosed home can be a great deal for a savvy consumer. With the right amount of planning ahead and research on the property and area, it's possible to save a lot of money on foreclosures despite the repairs and renovations they often come with. There are currently thousands of foreclosed homes for sale in Missouri, and relocating to the 'Show Me' State has a lot to offer.

Missouri is brimming with fascinating history during many important periods in the United States. As such, there are many historic sites and museums dedicated to this history. Grant's Farm, the ancestral home of Ulysses S. Grant, is now open for public tram tours showcasing the historic farm and the animals that live there. The childhood home of famous author Mark Twain has been turned into a museum where patrons can see some of the life and scenery that inspired his writing, including Tom Sawyer's infamous white picket fence. The state also contains memorial sites such as the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, Liberty Memorial and the famous Gateway Arch. More modern attractions include the Silver Dollar City, Worlds of Fun and Six Flags Over St. Louis amusement parks, as well as the Kaufman and Busch sports stadiums and the St. Louis and Kansas City Zoos.

The indigenous peoples of the Missouri area comprised the complex, advanced Mississppian culture, whose large cities and trade centers shaped the region before European settlers arrived in 1750. Missouri was a Spanish colony from 1762 until 1800 when Napoleon Bonaparte acquired it for French rule before it was sold to the United States in 1803 as part of the Louisiana Purchase. When the Confederate States began to secede in 1861, Missouri's government elected not to join them, but intense outcry from the public and dissenting government officials led to the Confederacy recognizing Missouri later that year. Following the Civil War, the state developed a composite economy equally dependent on industry and agriculture, which still shapes and informs its society today.

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